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Bowling News USA - December 6, 2010 The Schlemer Report - Viper Championship

Welcome to the newest addition of the Schlemer Report. This week I will be giving you the low down on the second event of the World Series of Bowling, the Viper Championship. Just like the Cheetah Championship, the Storm Nation was well represented. Of the top 16 finalists, five were using Storm products. Storm international staffer Andres Gomez led the way by qualifying in the number one position for his first ever PBA television appearance; free agent players Mike DeVaney and Amleto Monacelli also used the power of Storm to make the televised finals. Staffers Norm Duke and Tyler Jensen also finished 13th and 14th respectively.

So to mix things up a bit and add a new twist to the Schlemer Report, I will give you the rundown as to which balls each of the guys used in qualifying, then in match play, and follow with the details of the TV finals.

Tyler Jensen: During qualifying, Tyler used a pin-up Anarchy, pin-down 2Furious, and a pin-down Reign Supreme. He played between the third and fourth arrow to start and then moved deeper inside as the round went on. In the match play round, he used mainly the 2Furious and played around fourth arrow the entire nine games.

Norm Duke: During qualifying, Norm used a pin-up Prodigy, pin-down Tropical Heat Black/Silver, and a pin-up Tropical Heat Orange/Purple. He played between second and third arrow keeping his angles to a minimum. In match play, he started the round with the Prodigy straight up second arrow and then jumped into fourth arrow with the Tropical Heat Orange/Purple.

Amleto Monacelli: During qualifying, Amleto used a pin-up Virtual Energy and pin-down Hy-Road. He played between third and fourth arrow to start and then moved deeper as the round went on. In the match play round he used a pin-down Anarchy and a brand new pin-down Hy-Road and played between the third and fourth arrow the entire nine games.

Mike DeVaney: During qualifying, Mike used a pin-down 2Fast, pin-down 2Furious, pin-up Prodigy, and a pin-up Reign. He played between the third and fourth arrow to start and then moved deeper inside as the round went on. In the match play round, he used mainly the 2Furious and played between third and fourth arrow; when that hooked too early, he would switch to the 2Fast.

Andres Gomez: During qualifying, Andres used a recently drilled pin-up Flash Flood, pin-up Hy-Road, and a pin-up Reign. He played around fourth arrow to start and then moved deeper inside as the round went on. In the match play round, he used the Hy-Road and Reign in around fourth arrow the entire block.

Now onto the good stuff!

If you recall from last year’s WSOB Viper Championship televised finals, Mike DeVaney went onto claim the title using a Natural and Street Rod Pearl. It was far from a pretty victory – the high rev rates on that show tore the condition apart and made the condition extremely wet/dry. Flash forward now to this year’s WSOB Viper Championship televised finals… In match one Amleto Monacelli didn’t make a big enough move inside to allow himself room to get the pin-down Anarchy into a roll. Amleto kept trying to throw it harder to keep it on line but it just wasn’t his best option. He was caught up in the moment and later told me after the show that he was just so excited to be healthy and back on TV he wasn’t thinking clearly. He also told me that he thought about what I had told him just before his match and that using a weaker ball probably would have been the better option.

In match number two, Mike DeVaney who was looking to defend the Viper title came out firing a new Prodigy we drilled for the show. He had used a pin-up Prodigy here and there throughout the Viper event and felt the ball was close to what he needed, so we decided to drill another one for the show. This turned out to be a good option. We put the pin in the ring finger and CG down near the thumb. The idea behind this was to get the ball to tumble end over end without making a big change of direction. We added a little shine and the ball was his best option. Unfortunately, he didn’t adjust to the lanes fast enough and ended up with a couple costly open frames.

In the title match, Andres Gomez (making his PBA television debut) showed his youthful inexperience. He told me he didn’t want to veer too far from what got him to his first ever PBA show. The only problem with this was his opponent, Bill O’Neill, had played the lanes differently than everyone else all day, and was averaging 240+ to show for it. I told him that there was no question he could hit the pocket; my concern was whether he could carry enough to keep pace. As expected, he never missed the pocket but the pins just didn’t cooperate. Would he have carried more if he would have moved right and played straighter like O’Neill? Hard to say. No one knows, nor will they ever know. These are the types of decisions we have to make on every telecast.

Thanks for reading. We’ll see you back here next week for the Chameleon Championship!


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